Plants Quotes

Like plants in mines, which never saw the sun, But dream of him, and guess where he may be, And do the best to climb, and get to him. - Robert Browning

 

He that plants trees loves others beside himself. - Dr. Thomas Fuller

 

The thirsty Earth soaks up the Rain, And drinks, and gapes for Drink again; The Plants suck in the Earth and are With constant Drinking fresh and fair. - Abraham Cowley

 

A man doesn't plant a tree for himself. He plants it for posterity. - Alexander Smith

 

God moves in a mysterious way, His wonders to perform. He plants his footsteps in the sea, and rides upon the storm. - William Cowper

 

The diligent farmer plants trees, of which he himself will never see the fruit. [La., Abores serit diligens agricola, quarum adspiciet baccam ipse numquam] - Cicero [Marcus Tullius Cicero]

 

And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes, like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air. - Sir Francis Bacon

 

Aromatic plants bestow no spicy fragrance while they grow; but crush'd or trodden to the ground, diffuse their balmy sweets around. - Oliver Goldsmith

 

If there were only turnips and potatoes in the world, someone would complain that plants grow the wrong way. - Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

 

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." — Michael Pollan

 

"The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness." — John Muir

 

"I want my words to illuminate like the sun, as I give my daily lecture on photosynthesis to my houseplants." — Jarod Kintz

 

"We are made for loving. If we don’t love, we will be like plants without water." — Archbishop Desmond Tutu

 

"I remember my childhood names for grasses and secret flowers. I remember where a toad may live and what time the birds awaken in the summer -- and what trees and seasons smelled like -- how people looked and walked and smelled even. The memory of odors is very rich." — John Steinbeck

 

"How did these organs of plant sex manage to get themselves cross-wired with human ideas of value and status and Eros? And what might our ancient attraction for flowers have to teach us about the deeper mysteries of beauty - what one poet has called "this grace wholly gratuitous"? Is that what it is? Or does beauty have a purpose? — Michael Pollan

 

"Organic foods are richer in nutrients. This means they improve satiety and naturally help regulate body weight…Plants produce antioxidants to protect themselves from pests like insects and to withstand harsh weather. When they’re treated with chemicals such as pesticides, they don’t need to produce as much of their own natural defenses, so the levels are lower.” — Cynthia Sass

 

 

"Tell me of what plant-birthday a man takes notice, and I shall tell you a good deal about his vocation, his hobbies, his hay fever, and the general level of his ecological education."— Aldo Leopold

 

"There are transitional forms between the metals and non-metals; between chemical combinations and simple mixtures, between animals and plants, between phanerogams and cryptogams, and between mammals and birds [...]. The improbability may henceforth be taken for granted of finding in Nature a sharp cleavage between all that is masculine on the one side and all that is feminine on the other; or that any living being is so simple in this respect that it can be put wholly on one side, or wholly on the other, of the line." — Otto Weininger

 

"The planting of a tree, especially one of the long-living hardwood trees, is a gift which you can make to posterity at almost no cost and with almost no trouble, and if the tree takes root it will far outlive the visible effect of any of your other actions, good or evil." — George Orwell

 

"A thing which I regret, and which I will try to remedy some time, is that I have never in my life planted a walnut. Nobody does plant them nowadays—when you see a walnut it is almost invariably an old tree. If you plant a walnut you are planting it for your grandchildren, and who cares a damn for his grandchildren?" — George Orwell

 

"The plants in the garden - the aloes, the almond tree, the rose tree and the iris - were afraid of her. The flowers withered under her breath and the touch of her hand was leprous for the leaves. The plants whose growth is belief, whose breathing is hope, whose immobility is confidence and whose calyx is prayer, the plants who kept watch into the night, hated this women with the secret force of stars." — Hendrik Cramer

 

"I saw that animals were important. I saw that plants were even more important. I was also to learn that compared to many of the other species, we weren't important at all except for the damage we do. We do not rule the natural world, despite our conspicuous position in it. On the contrary, it is our lifeline, and we do well to try to understand its rules." — Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

 

"Plants don't have a brain because they are not going anywhere." — Robert Sylwester

 

"In its various forms, so far as we know them, Love seems always to have a deep significance and a most practical importance to us little mortals. In one form, as the mere semi-conscious Sex-love, which runs through creation and is common to the lowest animals and plants, it appears as a kind of organic basis for the unity of all creatures; in another, as the love of the mother for her offspring—which may also be termed a passion—it seems to pledge itself to the care and guardianship of the future race; in another, as the marriage of man and woman, it becomes the very foundation of human society. And so we can hardly believe that in its homogenic form, with which we are here concerned, it has not also a deep significance, and social uses and functions which will become clearer to us, the more we study it."— Edward Carpenter

 

"Dafür dass wir, wie auch die Tiere, von den Pflanzen leben, ja ohne sie nicht einmal atmen könnten, genügt kein einfacher Dank – Verehrung ist angebracht." — Ernst Jünger

 

Though of erect nature, man is far above the plants. For man's superior part, his head, is turned toward the superior part of the world, and h... - MORE Though of erect nature, man is far above the plants. For man's superior part, his head, is turned toward the superior part of the world, and his inferior part is turned toward the inferior world; and therefore he is perfectly disposed as to the general situation of his body. Plants have the superior part turned towards the lower world, since their roots correspond to the mouth, and their inferior parts towards the upper world.-Thomas Aquinas

 

You might think that after thousands of years of coming up too soon and getting frozen, the crocus family would have had a little sense knocke... - MORE You might think that after thousands of years of coming up too soon and getting frozen, the crocus family would have had a little sense knocked into it. -Robert Benchley

 

In preparing the soil for planting, you will need several tools. Dynamite would be a beautiful thing to use, but it would have a tendency to g... - MORE In preparing the soil for planting, you will need several tools. Dynamite would be a beautiful thing to use, but it would have a tendency to get the dirt into the front-hall and track up the stairs.-Robert Benchley

 

A garden is a lovesome thing, God wot! A garden is a lovesome thing, God wot!-Thomas Edward Brown

 

Evolution was in a strange mood when that creation came along.... It makes one wonder just where the plant world leaves off and the animal wor... - MORE Evolution was in a strange mood when that creation came along.... It makes one wonder just where the plant world leaves off and the animal world begins.-John Colton

 

Men are like plants; the goodness and flavor of the fruit proceeds from the peculiar soil and exposition in which they grow. We are nothing bu... - MORE Men are like plants; the goodness and flavor of the fruit proceeds from the peculiar soil and exposition in which they grow. We are nothing but what we derive from the air we breathe, the climate we inhabit, the government we obey, the system of religion we profess, and the nature of our employment.- Michel Guillaume Jean De Crevecoeur

To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,— To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,-Emily Dickinson